THE FESTIVAL IS CARRIED INTO THE FUTURE BY A DIVERSE SOCIETY

PUBLISHED FRIDAY 26.2.2021

Roskilde Festival Charity Society is currently facing one of the most important tasks ever – bringing both the festival and the community behind it through the corona crisis. Board members Olav Hesseldahl and Mie Levi Fenger share their visions for how the society – including the event Roskilde Festival – can remain relevant in a new reality.

Roskilde Festival is created every year by the non-profit organisation Roskilde Festival Charity Society and about 30,000 volunteers. In charge of the society is the board who is responsible for guiding the festival towards the future.

Right now, the society has to take both the festival and the community behind it through the corona crisis. This challenge is only feasible when backed by a diverse and curious society – at least if you ask board members Olav Hesseldahl and Mie Levi Fenger. They were both elected as members of the Roskilde Festival Charity Society board at the latest general assembly, arranged digitally on 8 October 2020.

Olav Hesseldahl and Mie Levi Fenger were both elected as members of the Roskilde Festival Charity Society board at the latest general assembly, arranged digitally on 8 October 2020.

Relevant in a new reality
Board member Mie Levi Fenger says:

”We’re in an extraordinary situation. The world keeps changing, and it’s our job in the board to make sure that we keep up. We must be curious and make sure that we can remain relevant in a new reality,” says Mie Levi Fenger.

For her, the development of the festival starts with a diverse society where many voices are addressed when setting the course for the society and the festival.

”Our society has to represent the enormous community that creates the festival. The greater diversity the members represent regarding gender, age, background and interests, the greater is the probability of addressing all issues. In that way we’ll get through the crisis the best way possible together. I hope that even more want to be a part of the society and let their votes matter.”

OLAV HESSELDAHL
Board member Olav Hesseldahl is 34 years old and is the CEO of non-profit organisation Ungdomsbureauet who works on including the Danish youth in the democracy. Moreover, he is a board member of the democracy festival Folkemødet and the Social Innovation Academy.

MIE LEVI FENGER
Board member Mie Levi Fenger is 33 years old and works with strategy and business development in the company SimCorp. She is also a member of the board for GreenMobility and has been involved in several start-ups.

Board member Olav Hesseldahl agrees:

”Of course, the pandemic is on our minds a lot! But we also make sure to tear ourselves away from the tentacles of the crisis and look ahead. Even though it can seem unrealistic right now, there is a life after COVID-19. Roskilde Festival must be ready for that. And we will be.”

For him, a part of the solution is getting more young people to engage in the society and its commitment. Because even though Roskilde Festival gathers thousands of young people, historically there has not been many young people engaged in the society.

”I see great challenges in the fact that the member count of the society is so low compared to the number of participants at the festival. Having a smaller group make decisions on behalf of a larger group is, unfortunately, not a unique thing – it’s something you see in almost every society board in Danmark. Our society is just the right one to take on that challenge! I believe that Roskilde Festival Charity Society can create more democracy.”

Mark your calendar: 22 March
On Monday 22 March, we’re having our annual general meeting in Roskilde Festival Charity Society. If you are a volunteer at Roskilde Festival, you can be a member of the society and join the general meeting. You can join via your profile on the festival’s intranet, People. The deadline is 1 March.